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How to avoid maximum exposure from exhaust gases?

Discussion in 'Safety First!' started by sungoa2010, Jul 1, 2012.

  1. sungoa2010

    sungoa2010

    Messages:
    2,878
    Goa
    We all know that the exhaust gases that coming from our vehicles contains poisonous gases and micro particles. For example the exhaust from a diesel engine contain more than 40 air contaminants. The micro particles that emitted from exhaust can be easily reach our lungs. We cannot completely get rid of from these gases but are we avoiding it to the level that is possible for us.

    1. The underground parking in shopping mall and cinema halls are deadly dangerous as the concentration of the exhaust gases are much high at these places.
    If there is option of outside parking opt for it.

    2. Park the vehicle with rear always outside. This will reduce the chance of entering the gases inside the home and also spreading the gases outside much freely

    3. Do not start the vehicle when people are about to enter or waiting near the rear. First allow them to sit inside close the windows and then reverse the car. If want to open the windows open it after moving few distances. While reversing the front passengers are at the risk of breathing the gas if windows are open.

    4. Do not always run in recirculation mode, use fresh air option frequently.

    5. In traffic jam close the window with ac in recirculation mode.

    6. Do not idle in residence area.

    7. Keep lot of plants near the garage.

    8. Switch of the engine when tail gate is opened.

    9. When getting out of the car switch of the car before occupants exit from it especially while carrying infants.

    These some points that came to me. Please share if you have more points to make.
    7 people like this.
  2. sungoa2010

    sungoa2010

    Messages:
    2,878
    Goa
    Here is a article from BBC Health about potential dangers of exhaust gas. Link to source BBC - Health: Exhaust emissions

    Exhaust emissions: what are they?

    The exhaust fumes from a car or lorry’s engine contains a large number of different chemicals or emissions.

    Once released into the air, exhaust emissions are breathed in and transported in the bloodstream to all the body's major organs. Diesel seems potentially to be more of a problem than petrol.

    Potentially dangerous vehicle emissions include:
    •Carbon monoxide
    •Carbon monoxide
    •Nitrogen dioxide
    •Sulphur dioxide
    •Benzene
    •Formaldehyde
    •Polycyclic hydrocarbons
    •Lead
    •Tiny suspended particles (‘particulate matter’)

    Top

    What are the risks?

    Although research has clearly linked exhaust emissions to a range of health problems in the population, the exact risk to any individual is difficult to define. However there is no doubt that the more you are exposed the greater the risk is likely to be and some people, for example those who already have respiratory conditions such as asthma or bronchitis, are especially vulnerable.

    The most obvious health impact of car emissions is on the respiratory system. It's estimated that air pollution - of which vehicle emissions are the major contributor - is responsible for 24,000 premature deaths in the UK every year. Many of these deaths are due to asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory diseases - all of which are known to be aggravated by exposure to car fumes.

    A Dutch study of 632 children aged seven to 11 years found that respiratory disorders worsened as air pollution increased and a longer term study of older Dutch residents, published in 2009 found that illness due to lung disorders increased in areas of high nitrogen dioxide and particulate matter associated with exhaust emissions.

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    Impact on blood

    Many pollutants produce harmful effects on the blood and the coronary system. Researchers estimate that one in every 50 heart attacks in London may be triggered by air pollution.

    Lead, for instance, interferes with the normal formation of red blood cells by inhibiting important enzymes. It also damaged red blood cell membranes’ and interferes with cell metabolism in a way that shortens the survival of each individual cell. This can lead to anaemia - a shortage of blood cells - which can reduce the body's ability to circulate oxygen and vital nutrients.

    Benzene has a suppressive effect on bone marrow and impairs the development of red blood cells. Exposure to the chemical may result in a diminished number of blood cells - cytopenia - or total bone marrow loss.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is similar to suffocation. CO binds to the haemoglobin contained in red blood cells 200 times more effectively than oxygen, and so can dramatically reduce the ability of the cells to transport and release oxygen to the tissues of the body.

    Toxic chemicals may also stimulate the immune system to attack the body's own tissues, particularly the cells that line human blood vessels. The damage is initially slight, but it can build up with repetitive exposure to toxic substances and eventually lead to blockage of the blood vessels, increasing the risk of high blood pressure and heart disease.

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    Central nervous system

    Research has shown that exposure to lead can lead to behavioural changes. It can also impair mental function, causing problems with learning and memory. German research suggests that the impact of lead on the central nervous system may grow older with advancing age.

    The immune system appears to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of pollution. Substances such as benzene, nitrogen dioxide and small particulate matter interact with the immune system and may cause changes, ranging from overactive immune responses to immunosuppression.

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    Cause of cancer

    Long-term exposure to Benzene has been shown cause leukaemia. It's also thought that the harmful impact that the chemical can have on the immune system may lower the body's defence against tumours.

    Polycyclic hydrocarbons are also thought to be carcinogenic. Several of these compounds have caused tumours in laboratory animals when they ate them, when they were applied to their skin, or when they breathed them in the air for long periods of time. Studies in animals have also shown that polycyclic hydrocarbons can cause harmful effects on the skin and on body fluids and it's thought that polycyclic hydrocarbons are responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer in gas and coke oven workers and foundry workers.

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    What can you do about it?

    Government and a variety of environmental organisations are constantly working to reduce the impact of exhaust pollution. These are a good source of information if you are concerned.

    You can also check that your employers are taking steps to prevent or control your exposure in the workplace, for example if you work in a motor or traffic related industry.

    Under the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1994 (COSHH) employers have to make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to your health if you are exposed to diesel or petrol fumes. They must then take the necessary steps to prevent or adequately control your exposure in the workplace, for example by putting in workplace air extraction fans or air vents, or fitting tailpipe exhaust extraction or filter systems. They should also provide suitable personal protective equipment

    You can also take steps yourself such as avoiding exposure whenever possible, turning off engines when not required, keeping your vehicle in good repairs and dealing swiftly with any evidence that the engine may be producing high levels of emissions. Its also advisable not to eat or smoke in areas where there is likely to be exposure, to wash your hands and face before drinking, eating or leaving work, avoid skin contact with fuel, and to correctly wear any respiratory protective equipment or personal protective equipment when appropriate.
    1 person likes this.
  3. prakhar_lfc

    prakhar_lfc Superiore

    Messages:
    607
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Linea T-Jet
    2 people like this.
  4. Ganges

    Ganges Esperto

    Messages:
    3,121
    Driver Seat _/
    :
    Grande Punto 1.3
    Nice thread sun,
    full of information.Lets be healthy and keep others healthy :)

    i'm little bit lazy to go back to manual,please clear my doubt.
    in recirculation mode the outside air is passed into the cabin ?
    if i switch to recirculation mode in traffic jam,you can feel the pollutants inside the cabin ?
    1 person likes this.
  5. prakhar_lfc

    prakhar_lfc Superiore

    Messages:
    607
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Linea T-Jet
    No, outside air enters the cabin in the "fresh air" mode.
  6. Ganges

    Ganges Esperto

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    3,121
    Driver Seat _/
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    Grande Punto 1.3
    prakhar
    then what happens in recirculation mode ?
  7. sungoa2010

    sungoa2010

    Messages:
    2,878
    Goa
    In recirculation mode only the inside air is taken cooled and given back to the cabin. It cools much effectively. You can check it by switching between two modes.
  8. Ganges

    Ganges Esperto

    Messages:
    3,121
    Driver Seat _/
    :
    Grande Punto 1.3
    its my bad,i was thinking either way :D
    thanks sun and prakhar for clearing the doubt.
    1 person likes this.
  9. prakhar_lfc

    prakhar_lfc Superiore

    Messages:
    607
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India
    Linea T-Jet
    Recirculation means air from inside the car is reused and cooled.
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  10. Ganges

    Ganges Esperto

    Messages:
    3,121
    Driver Seat _/
    :
    Grande Punto 1.3
    yeah ,
    got it mate,
    sometimes few words are related to our mind set,like recirculation makes me to think to return it back to atmosphere. :D
    if you say liverpool first thing comes to my mind is Gerard eventhough he plays for england i will always think him as good captain for liverpool , doesnt matter which country he is playing(though being in background the english county team, unless a deep thought to head for his citizenship :D )
    1 person likes this.

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